Tag Archives: Ohio

Day 15 365 Project

Triangle Bar sign in Newark, Ohio.
Antique sign for the Triangle Bar in Newark, Ohio

Tonight was a fun night. See the guy poking his head around the corner? He had a problem with me taking a photo of the sign and wanted to argue about it. I left when he told me to wait right there because he’d be back. LOL.

Street photography intrigues me because of this idea. There’s no law against taking photos in the street. It’s 100% legal, but maybe not safe. What’s fun that’s safe anyhow?

Day 5 365 Project

Cranes Over Newark, Ohio
Cranes Over Newark, Ohio

It was freezing today. The bitter cold stopped me from venturing to far for a photo, so this is what we get for today. It’s cranes up in the back alleys of Newark, Ohio.

These cranes irritate me and they shouldn’t. They should be a sign that downtown business are investing and that they’re optimistic of the future.  I researched the projects and that’s not the whole story. I’m afraid to even write what the real story is for fear of being sued.

It’s a powerful and secretive club putting all of this together. I’ll leave it at that. If you’re interested, do the research yourself. It takes some digging to see how the money works for these projects.

Instead of writing about it and doing all of the work to talk about it, I’m going to take a back seat and watch it unfold. I’m getting older. It will be interesting to watch the younger generation cope with the outcomes of this. Will they learn a lesson about government’s role, businesses role, the press’s role, and a citizen’s duty?

The Old Trees At Dysart Park In Ohio


Ancient trees at Dysart Woods.
Ancient trees at Dysart Woods Park in Belmont County, Ohio.

I read about the trees at Dysart Woods Park in Ohio and decided to check them out. It was awesome to be standing in the oldest forest in Ohio with these huge trees. They made one feel small.

There was one undeniable fact though. They were so old they were dying. Dead timber was everywhere.

Massive Oak Tree
Massive oak tree in Dysart Park in Ohio.

In all of the posts that I read concerning the effects that coal mining may have in the area, they never mentioned just how poor of condition that these trees are already in. They’ll tell you that the coal companies are going to kill off 400 year old trees for shock value, but forget to tell you that these trees are falling over on their own already.

The Ohio State government has granted the coal company the permit to mine under sections of Dysart, so we’ll find out how this goes over the years to come.

Shining Some Light On History

I can understand where genealogy research can bore some people. If you catch the bug though, I highly recommend following through with the project. My research led to many ancestors being buried in this simple church yard in Condit, Ohio.

Mount Pleasant Church
Mount Pleasant Church in Condit, Ohio.

This was the church of my ancestors and many of them are buried here. All of their farms were nearby.

According to the historical records of these folks, the new revisionists version of history missed them somehow. Not much white privilege were they bestowed. The were simple farmers and a few found their way to the battlefields according to the tombstones.

This is why I find genealogy to be important. When you see the records and get to know your real history, you see the lies their selling you today.

Time Takes It’s Toll

It’s strange how an old barn falling apart in the middle of the country doesn’t have the same eyesore effect that a building in the city does. In the country, it just seems like a natural, inevitable process.  All around this old barn McMansions are springing up and large commercial farms are still operating in full swing. This old relic is just a good place for vultures to roost now.

Old decaying barn.
Old barn rots away.

Old decaying barn

Pulley for hay bales on an old barn.
Pulley for hay bales on an old barn.

The Hooded Merganser Duck

Hooded Merganser Duck
A Hooded Merganser Duck taking flight.

I got a pleasant surprise yesterday as I headed to the woods on the first nice Saturday of 2014, a small flock of strange looking ducks called Hooded Mergansers were in the Licking River at Blackhand Gorge near Newark, Ohio.

Usually, ducks pretty much ignore you, but these are a little more stealthy. By the time I got a bead on them, they started taking flight. My camera has a sports mode that rapid fires and it’s a big help with wildlife. The quality of the photo isn’t as good, but it’s better to get a photo than none at all. This photo was the only one that even had a duck in it.

This is the first Hooded Merganser I’ve ever seen. It’s quite a thrill to get wildlife that’s out of the ordinary and it always happens when you least expect it.

The Power Of Water

One of Ohio’s largest assets is water. It’s a draw for agriculture, industry, and people. No matter how much tech we get, water is the secret source of wealth in any society. Don’t believe me? Look at a map of where the wealth is and you’ll see where the water is.

Ohio’s wealth is fresh water, much more valuable than salt water. You don’t necessarily see fresh water in the same way that you do the oceans. Ohio’s ocean is for the most part, underground.  We do get to see it in small rivers all over the state though.

I don’t get on my environmental band wagons. It’s so easy to see through the hypocrisy and ignorance of the leaders like Al Gore and friends. Ohio’s water though, it’s different. It’s not difficult to treat it with care. It’s so plentiful that simply being a mindful steward of it will keep it in check.

Here’s a photo of my hometown’s water supply flowing down from the north. It wasn’t that long ago that enforcement was finally placed on the towns north of us to stop dumping sewage into it.

The Licking River in Newark, Ohio
The Licking River In Newark, Ohio

The true measure of health in the river is really easy to know. All you need to ask is, “Are there fish in it?”.

Fishing in the Licking River in Newark, Ohio
Fishing in the Licking River in Newark, Ohio.