Tag Archives: history

Putnam Historic District. A New Photo Challenge For Me.

Putnam Historic District is one of the oldest settlements in Ohio. I just never paid attention to this part of Zanesville, Ohio before. Now that I’ve found it, I will be back with the camera frequently.

Age brings interesting textures, colors, and shapes that only time can make happen. In this section of an old painted brick building, the windows are not square, the paint peeling from the bricks with this blue color is unique, and the makeshift metal work would never happen in any other way other than a make-do repair.

Blue brick building in Zanesville, Ohio.
Old blue brick building on Muskingum Avenue in Zanesville, Ohio.

There are streets full of interesting old houses too. Many are in need of serious repair.

Putnam Historic District home.
Interesting old house in the Putnam Historic District Of Zanesville, Ohio.

Same with the houses as the blue brick building; nothing is square. Everything in a structure collapses at a different rate depending on so many different variables. It’s interesting. There is always the hope that somebody will save the old building.

I discovered there is an effort to revive the area with arts and entertainment. This is common in the historic areas of Ohio. It’s a heroic effort, but a gamble. The results of the efforts vary depending on public support and much of that support is forced by government grants with complex strings attached.

I’ll be back for more exploration of the area.

The Historic Russell-Cooper House In Mount Vernon, Ohio.

The Historic Russell-Cooper House In Mount Vernon, Ohio.

Russell-Cooper House On Gambier Street in Mount Vernon, Ohio
The Russell-Cooper House in Mount Vernon, Ohio

The Russell-Cooper House is a bed and breakfast in Mount Vernon, Ohio. The home was built in 1830’s and remained in one family until the current owner.

I remember this being referred to as “The Birthday Cake House” when I was younger. Mount Vernon was safe enough then that I was free to roam the east side of town on my bicycle and explore. As a boy, I often wondered why anyone would need such a huge house.

Most of these large house have been maintained. Some are converted into apartments. They all have “carriage houses” in the back where horses were kept.

There is more detailed information at the Russell-Cooper House website.

The Elbow Lounge In Newark, Ohio

The Elbow Is Now A Health Hazard In Downtown Newark, Ohio

I was never in it. I hear that the city isn’t missing much with it gone. All that matters now is that it’s a health hazard. Bricks are falling off of it and it’s a temptation for a break-ins and the usual problems that come with abandoned buildings.

Back of The Elbow Lounge in Newark, Ohio.
The back of The Elbow Lounge in Newark, Ohio.

According to an old newspaper article I found, the county bought the property quite a while back. Still, other than the added fence around it, not much has been done with it.

The ghost advertising shows that it was once called The Kern Hotel.

The Tecumseh Theater In Shawnee, Ohio.

I’m learning something about photography and that is that if you want the really cool shots, you have to keep returning to the really cool places. Everytime I return to Shawnee, Ohio, I meet more people and learn more things.

This Winter I went to Shawnee a few times. I met Jason, a friendly native of Shawnee a few times. He keeps a good an eye on things and is quick to direct you to whoever you need to talk to if you want more information. He said he left Shawnee for a while, but returned and bought the house he grew up in.  Then there’s Charlie and his friendly(and very large) Burmese Mountain Dog. This last visit, there was George Biggs. He gave us the grand tour of the interior of The Tecumseh Theater.

George Biggs gave me so much information that I’m not sure I got it all straight. A can refer you to the Tecumseh Theater website or the Tecumseh Commons Facebook page for more information.  The rest of this post is a collection of photos I took of the interior.
The first big site George showed us was the old marquee for The New Linda Theater.

New Linda Theater Marquee Sign In Shawnee, Ohio.
The marquee sign from The New Linda Theater in Shawnee, Ohio.

Click Here for the full size download.
Click here for the Flickr Creative Commons information and download. 

The Tecumseh as a lot of antiques from around the town too. There is a wall of bottles that were from the drugstore that closed across the street. Corby’s Whiskey was probably a stable of the working man then too.

Antique Corby's Whiskey Bottle.
Old Corby’s Whiskey bottle.

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Leaving the main floor, we headed up a flight of stairs to the ticket booth. 35 Cents per couple for admission.

The ticket booth at The New Linda Theater in Shawnee.
The ticket booth. 35 Cents per couple.

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As we entered, the antique remnants of the film days were displayed. These are the old film reels and canisters. Each one could hold about 20 minutes of a movie. The plastic reels were used for shipping for cheap shipping weights and the metal were used during the operation of the projector.

Old movies film reels.
Old movie film reels.

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This is an old Peerless Magnarc movie projector. The “arc” in the name Magnarc comes from the fact that the old movie projectors operated by arcing 2 welding rods together to create light for the projection. The pipe on top was needed to vent out the gasses from the burning welding rods.

Peerless Magnarc movie projector.
An old Peerless Magnarc movie projector.

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The RCA Photophone Super Simplex soundhead worked with the project to play the soundtrack with the movie.

RCA Photophone Super Simplex sound
RCA Photophone Super Simplex sound equipment.

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The stage was in bad shape. The curtain is stuck half way down. Props were still there and an old antique sign were laying around on it.

Stage at New Linda Theater in Shawnee, Ohio.
Stage at the New Linda Theater

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It wasn’t hard to imagine events in the theater when I turned around to look at the balcony. Movies were only part of the theater’s use. Basketball and dancing were common too.

Balcony of The New Linda Theater in Shawnee, Ohio.
Balcony in The New Linda Theater in Shawnee, Ohio.

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Click here for the Flickr Creative Commons information and download. 

The balcony view gives a good feel of what a show might have been like so long ago. It also shows more detail of the work that needs to be done and the work that has been done.

Balcony view of the New Linda Theater.
Balcony view of The New Linda Theater.

Click here for the full size download.

Click here for the Flickr Creative Commons information and download. 

I thank George Biggs for his hospitality and the tour. The Tecumseh Theater is an ongoing project that history buffs may want to take more interest in. George explained that the geographic location of the town kind of keeps it off the radar for many and they’re working to change that.

If you’re in the area, stop and do some exploring of your own in Shawnee. The Tecumseh is just one building in a group of that are worth exploring.

Shining Some Light On History

I can understand where genealogy research can bore some people. If you catch the bug though, I highly recommend following through with the project. My research led to many ancestors being buried in this simple church yard in Condit, Ohio.

Mount Pleasant Church
Mount Pleasant Church in Condit, Ohio.

This was the church of my ancestors and many of them are buried here. All of their farms were nearby.

According to the historical records of these folks, the new revisionists version of history missed them somehow. Not much white privilege were they bestowed. The were simple farmers and a few found their way to the battlefields according to the tombstones.

This is why I find genealogy to be important. When you see the records and get to know your real history, you see the lies their selling you today.