Category Archives: History

Museums Add Perspective And Create Appreciation

Perspective and Appreciation From Museums

We visited the Alpine Hills Historical Museum and Sugarcreek Information Center in Sugarcreek, Ohio. These things caught my eye as the printing equipment and cameras relate to what I work with today.

I work in the printing industry, but more on the computer programming end of it. I never learned the history of printing, so i found the explanation of this Linotype machine educational.

Antique Linotype for printing.
Antique Linotype machine used to create lines of text for printing presses.

A simple cell phone can basically do what this did. It simply produced lines of text to be sent to a printing press. A Linotype machine was a little more dangerous as it used and reused molten led to create this lines.

Today, it is so easy to create a line of text for print that it requires very little thought. This might be part of the problem of so much which is printed, but not worth the paper or electronic device that it’s ready from. Restraints can create quality.

Antique 8x10 Camera
Antique 8×10 Camera

The same could be said for this antique camera. In it’s day, this was considered high quality and portable. The cell phone camera is better than this camera in many respects now.

There are infinitely more great photos now than then, but images from this time still hold great value. The same  can be said of many of the literary works produced in the days before so much automation.

In no way am in longing for these days. I am saying that the technological restrictions of yesterday created an editing process by default. There was a sense to not waste the resources due to costs and difficulty of the process.

Today we have the ability to produce low quality because of low cost and ease of production. To combat this I rarely put out a written work without edits and proof reading. I always “Photoshop” images to make them unique to my developing process.

Abandoned Tire Store

Abandoned Tire Store In Zanesville, Ohio

When you look around the Putnam Historic District in Zanesville, Ohio, you can see history in different stages. From the beginning of the state, to present.

This tire store is an odd duck in the area, but you can see recent history here. This was probably a good business at one time. It would have been the tire specialty types of stores of the 80’s and 90’s. They replaced the gas stations where tires were replaced before this.

Abandoned tire store in Zanesville, Ohio.
Abandoned tire store in Zanesville, Ohio.

Time goes on, things change.

The Historic Russell-Cooper House In Mount Vernon, Ohio.

The Historic Russell-Cooper House In Mount Vernon, Ohio.

Russell-Cooper House On Gambier Street in Mount Vernon, Ohio
The Russell-Cooper House in Mount Vernon, Ohio

The Russell-Cooper House is a bed and breakfast in Mount Vernon, Ohio. The home was built in 1830’s and remained in one family until the current owner.

I remember this being referred to as “The Birthday Cake House” when I was younger. Mount Vernon was safe enough then that I was free to roam the east side of town on my bicycle and explore. As a boy, I often wondered why anyone would need such a huge house.

Most of these large house have been maintained. Some are converted into apartments. They all have “carriage houses” in the back where horses were kept.

There is more detailed information at the Russell-Cooper House website.

History Is A Patchwork

The Patchwork Of History

Newark Advocate Building Torn Down
The Old Newark Advocate Building

Looking at the remaining wall next to where The Old Newark Advocate building used to stand is quite a history lesson. Look at all the different layers of different wall coverings. Now that it the building is gone, the patchwork of different walls, peeling back to reveal how different they appeared at different times.

If you asked someone for their recollection of the building, you’re going to get different stories depending on what time they were there. Time is always changing and so are viewpoints of history.

I think the biggest telltale sign of a history bullshitter is a person who takes one perspective of a historical even and demands that that viewpoint represents all of the fact. Sadly, it’s not hard to find a history bullshitter.

A Foggy Day For National Road History

National Road History On 1/2/2017

National Road History peaks my interest. Every year, less and less evidence of the old road exist. More vanishes and gives way to newer things. Today I rode from Route 13 to Columbus, Ohio on Route 40 to have a look.

The Jack Town Pub Is Gone

The Jack Town Pub On The National Road in Jacksontown, Ohio.
The Jack Town Pub On Route 40 in Jacksontown, Ohio.

Today, 1/2/2017, The Jack Town Pub is gone.

Jack Town Pub Leveled
The Jack Town Pub is now gone.

I heard so many rumors about the demise of The Jack Town Pub that I wouldn’t really know the exact cause. What replaces it will tell me more about what really happened here. The end result though, a missing piece of Licking County, Ohio history on The National Road. Not all of it can be saved. We can hope something promising replaces it.

The Shamrock Is Falling Into Severe Disrepair

The Shamrock Motel in Etna, Ohio on route 40.
The Shamrock Motel On The National Road

Old historical buildings tend to turn into rummage sales, antique stores, and flea markets before their demise. It’s as if they are recalling better times and spewing out remnants from those days.

Rural decay on The National Road.
The rural decay of The Shamrock Motel on The National Road.
Motel room office for The Shamrock In Etna, Ohi.
The office for the motel rooms at The Shamrock on Route 40.

National Road history is so interesting because it’s still alive. You can drive out to it and touch and feel it. The modern day equivalent roars loud nearby on Interstate 70.

The road stretches from the middle of Illinois to Baltimore, Maryland. Where it starts and stops depends on what level of National Road purist you are.

Today’s foggy January 2, 2017 visit was just another witness to the state of the road. As for so long, it just slowly rots away and occasionally headway is made and new businesses arrive.

The Woodward Opera House In Mount Vernon, Ohio

I finally had the chance to see The Woodward Opera House in Mount Vernon, Ohio. The theater operated from the 1850’s – 1920’s. What an interesting experience to stand in a theater vacated since the 1920’s! It’s likely that I had ancestors that visited this theater.

Part of the reason that this incredible building is standing is that it was part of a building that had many other uses. While theater might have only been used for storage, the rest of the building remained active.

The Woodward Opera House in Mount Vernon, Ohio.
The stage of The Woodward Opera House in Mount Vernon, Ohio.
The balcony of The Woodward Opera House.
The balcony of The Woodward Opera House.
The remains of an old poster in The Woodward Opera House.
The remains of an old poster.

Here is a video with a detailed explanation of the history of The Woodward Opera House.

Knox County, Ohio Spring House Remains

I admit, I’m to young to know what this was. I had to post it to Facebook to find out from older people that this was a spring house.

Spring house in Knox County, Ohio.
Spring house on Sycamore Road in southern Knox County, Ohio.

They were very important buildings on farms before electricity and other methods of refrigeration came into use.  The idea was so simple; Use the cool air rising from a spring to cool a building.

Some were made of wood, but the moist air would rot them quickly. Many times wood was used temporarily until enough fieldstone could be gathered to make one out of stone.

Why this one survives when I have never seen another, I don’t know. Here is a better explanation of spring houses if you’re interested.

Shining Some Light On History

I can understand where genealogy research can bore some people. If you catch the bug though, I highly recommend following through with the project. My research led to many ancestors being buried in this simple church yard in Condit, Ohio.

Mount Pleasant Church
Mount Pleasant Church in Condit, Ohio.

This was the church of my ancestors and many of them are buried here. All of their farms were nearby.

According to the historical records of these folks, the new revisionists version of history missed them somehow. Not much white privilege were they bestowed. The were simple farmers and a few found their way to the battlefields according to the tombstones.

This is why I find genealogy to be important. When you see the records and get to know your real history, you see the lies their selling you today.